The Fukuoka mayoral election

A campaign van for one of the mayoral candidates, with a loud PA systemA campaign van for one of the mayoral candidates, with a loud PA system
A campaign van for one of the mayoral candidates, with a loud PA system13-Nov-2014 13:41, HTC EVO, 2.0, 3.63mm, 0.004 sec, ISO 100
 
A campaign board, featuring the Fukuoka mayoral candidates. The small posters on either side are using the Fukuoka Hawks baseball team to encourage people to voteA campaign board, featuring the Fukuoka mayoral candidates. The small posters on either side are using the Fukuoka Hawks baseball team to encourage people to vote
A campaign board, featuring the Fukuoka mayoral candidates. The small posters on either side are using the Fukuoka Hawks baseball team to encourage people to vote15-Nov-2014 11:50, Canon Canon PowerShot ELPH 110 HS, 2.7, 4.3mm, 0.003 sec, ISO 200
 
A candidate for mayor in Fukuoka, campaigning with a megaphone in front of the Apple storeA candidate for mayor in Fukuoka, campaigning with a megaphone in front of the Apple store
A candidate for mayor in Fukuoka, campaigning with a megaphone in front of the Apple store11-Nov-2014 11:20, Canon Canon PowerShot ELPH 110 HS, 5.9, 21.5mm, 0.002 sec, ISO 200
 

This past Sunday was election day in Fukuoka, for the Mayoral race. There were 6 candidates, and the popular incumbent mayor, Soichiro Takashima, won easily. He was only 36 when he was first elected, making him an unusually young politician by Japanese standards (he’s 40 now). There is an excellent article at TechInAsia.com that provides a good overview of Fukuoka’s favorable economic environment, and includes an interview with the Mayor (in English). Fukuoka has been designated by the central government as a “National Strategic Zone” for economic development, which means certain regulations are removed or lessened here. Takashima is using the designation as an opportunity to focus on making the city friendly to start-up businesses. Also, he was previously a TV personality, so he knows how to make good use of the media. For example, he made an appearance in Fukuoka’s “Happy” video (he’s the 3rd person they show).

The mayoral campaign went on for only two weeks, as the campaign seasons here are short, and have a legally specified start date. Vans with loud PA systems trolled the streets during that time, and I saw one of the candidates campaigning with a megaphone in front of the Apple store. To understand just how different the political campaigns here are from the US, I’ll quote myself from 7 years ago, when we were in Tokyo during the mayoral race there:

Japanese political campaigns are very different from the US’. On the face of it, the Japanese constitution’s guarantee of free speech is similar to the US’. I don’t know the legal history, but it seems that the definition of “speech” here is much more narrowly construed than it is in the US, at least as far as political campaigns are concerned. During campaign season here, politicians spend a lot of time making speeches near major train stations, and in that environment they can say just about anything they want, just like politicians in the US. The reason they spend so much time out on the street is that they can’t advertise on TV. Ads for political parties are allowed, but not for individual campaigns. Even the party ads are very limited in what they can say. They can’t attack their opponents, and they can’t say too much about all the great things they would do (as that’s just another way of making their opponents look bad). So the end result is typically short, banal ads showing one of the party leaders saying something like “Go Japan!”

The campaign season also has a defined starting date – candidates can’t campaign before that date… Campaign posters can go up on privately owned buildings as their owners sees fit, but posters in public spaces have to go on boards that are put up by the city specifically for that purpose…

Fukuoka Now translated the slogans of each of the 6 candidates. They are banal political slogans as you might expect, but they do provide an interesting window into the issues that are on the minds of politicians and voters here. The slogans bring up concerns over education, economic development, and Japan’s depopulation problem:

Tomoyuki Okawa (37): Changing Society through Education
“The problems facing society were made by humans. The only way to resolve them is with educational reforms.”

Soichiro Takashima (40): Fukuoka is Alive Again
“It is Fukuoka’s job to provide the rest of Japan with hopes and dreams. We will use the National Strategic Zone designation to become a town that supports people willing to take a chance.”

Yujiro Kitajima (65): Formulating a Roadmap to Combat Population Decline
“I firmly believe it my mission to ensure that Fukuoka takes the lead among Japan’s municipalities in formulating a road map for solving the crisis that is Japan’s dwindling population.”

Hiroshi Yoshida (58): Helping Citizens Forge Ahead
“Is our current leadership what we really need? The citizens need someone who can give them a helping hand. We need to cut waste and create policies that look to the future.”

Kumiko Takemura (64): The Happiness of Our Children is No. 1
“I will end City Hall’s unfriendly childrens’ policies … and increase the number of authorized child-care facilities.”

Kouko Kanaide (67): Improving Working Conditions for Women
“As society ages and the population declines, women will need to work while they care for their children.”

Japanese mansions

"Oh, you're looking for the Martians - they live next door""Oh, you're looking for the Martians - they live next door"
"Oh, you're looking for the Martians - they live next door"27-Sep-2014 20:03, Canon Canon PowerShot ELPH 110 HS, 4.0, 7.507mm, 0.067 sec, ISO 1600
 

The word “mansion” (マンション) in Japanese is borrowed from English, but its meaning is almost exactly the opposite. Instead of a vast ornate home made of marble, a mansion in Japan is roughly equivalent to an American condominium. A mansion building is usually 3 or more stories, has a central entrance, is made of steel and concrete, and the units have thick walls. The place we’re living in now is a mansion. Mansions are a step up from “apaato” (アパート)which are generally smaller, cheaper buildings that have units with thin walls.

The sale and rental listings for mansions use a concise set of acronyms. For example a 2LDK has 2 bedrooms, and a living, dining, and kitchen area (one bathroom is standard, so it’s not part of the acronym). Other possibilities are 3LDK, 1K, 2DK, etc. The exact meaning can be slippery sometimes though: our place in Fukuoka was listed as a 2LDK, but the “LDK” part is just one fairly small room with a kitchen counter, couch, small table, and TV stand jammed into it. It’s really a 2DK.

Our place also has a washing machine and a balcony, both of which are also standard with mansions. Like most mansions, ours doesn’t have a clothes dryer. So we do what the Japanese do, which is hang our clothes to dry on the balcony. Our washing machine has a hose which we can optionally put in the bath, to re-use bath water for the initial wash cycle (the Japanese always shower before getting in the soaking tub, so the water is fairly clean).

The listing for our mansion is still online, and has photos and the floor plan, if you want to see what it looks like.

It’s common to have a business on the first floor, and it’s usually something like a dry cleaners or a convenience store. In our case, it’s a mental clinic, and there’s a wedding planner on the second floor.

Our "mansion" building in FukuokaOur "mansion" building in Fukuoka
Our "mansion" building in Fukuoka11-Jul-2014 15:46, Canon Canon PowerShot ELPH 110 HS, 2.7, 4.3mm, 0.005 sec, ISO 100
 
Re-using bath water in the washing machineRe-using bath water in the washing machine
Re-using bath water in the washing machine10-Jul-2014 08:31, Canon Canon PowerShot ELPH 110 HS, 2.7, 4.3mm, 0.04 sec, ISO 800
 
The toilet in our apartment in Fukuoka has 18 buttonsThe toilet in our apartment in Fukuoka has 18 buttons
The toilet in our apartment in Fukuoka has 18 buttons07-Jun-2014 06:29, Sony C2004, 2.8, 3.49mm, 0.033 sec, ISO 440
 

The SoftBank Hawks and the Fukuoka Dome

The crowd getting ready for the balloon release at the end of the 7th inningThe crowd getting ready for the balloon release at the end of the 7th inning
The crowd getting ready for the balloon release at the end of the 7th inning02-Sep-2014 19:21, Canon Canon PowerShot ELPH 110 HS, 2.7, 4.3mm, 0.033 sec, ISO 320
 
Eidan outside the Yahoo Dome, before the start of the Hawks gameEidan outside the Yahoo Dome, before the start of the Hawks game
Eidan outside the Yahoo Dome, before the start of the Hawks game02-Sep-2014 15:46, Canon Canon PowerShot ELPH 110 HS, 2.7, 4.3mm, 0.001 sec, ISO 200
 

As an American used to going to baseball stadiums in the US, attending a professional Japanese baseball game is a surreal and amazing experience: the pristine cleanliness, the “beer girls” serving beer from pony kegs strapped to their backs, the food, the cheerleaders, the non-stop choreographed chanting and cheering from the crowd… In 2010 I wrote a post describing my amazement going to my first Japanese baseball game, seeing the Yomiuri Giants play at the Tokyo dome. If you haven’t read that post before, please do – it’s one of the best on my blog.

I went to my second game a couple months ago, with Maria and the boys. We saw Fukuoka’s SoftBank Hawks play at the Fukuoka Dome. We went with my Japanese tutor and her family. Overall, it was a more mellow experience than my previous one. The Fukuoka Dome is not as big as the Tokyo Dome, and the game we attended was not very crowded, so the constant chanting and cheering from crowd was not overwhelming like it was at the Giants’ game. But there are a couple things that make seeing a game at the Dome a special experience. In the US we have the 7th inning stretch, while in Fukuoka the 7th inning is when the crowd participates in a stadium wide, simultaneous release of thousands of phallic balloons. Watch the video:

The other special thing is that they partially open the dome and put on a small fireworks display if the Hawks win. The game we attended ended in a tie however, so there were no fireworks. This is one of the few ways Japan’s baseball rules differ from the US’ – if there is no winner by the 12th inning, the game is declared a draw.

If you’re wondering about the team’s name, SoftBank is a mobile phone company: most baseball teams here have corporate sponsors. This can result in some amusing names, like the Hokkaido “Nippon Ham” Fighters. The names can also change over time, as the fortunes of their sponsors rise and fall: the Hawks used to be the Daiei Hawks, until Daiei went into bankruptcy and was forced to sell the team in 2005.

On October 31, the Hawks won the Japan Series, which is Japan’s equivalent of the World Series. They beat the Hanshin Tigers (Hanshin is a railway company). Japan has leagues similar to the US: the Hawks beat the Hokkaido Fighters in the Pacific League “Climax series” before continuing to the Japan Series.

Local support for the Hawks is very strong in Fukuoka. All season long, on game days, all the bus and taxi drivers in town wear Hawks shirts. In the Tenjin Chikagai underground shopping area, they were playing the team’s theme song almost non-stop during the Climax Series and the Japan Series.

The Dome is sheathed in titanium and “…is so valuable that in 2004, Tom Barrack, a billionaire real-estate mogul, bought the dome simply because the roof alone was worth the purchase price.” At the time it was built in 1993, it was Japan’s first stadium with a retractable dome. It’s current official name is the “Yafuoku! Dome,” which is the name for Yahoo’s auctions web site in Japan. It’s changed names a couple times, but people generally refer to it is as the Yahoo Dome or the Fukuoka Dome.

The Yahoo Dome, viewed from the Hilton hotelThe Yahoo Dome, viewed from the Hilton hotel
The Yahoo Dome, viewed from the Hilton hotel21-Jul-2014 15:50, Canon Canon PowerShot ELPH 110 HS, 2.7, 4.3mm, 0.003 sec, ISO 100
 
The Yahoo Dome, where Fukuoka's SoftBank Hawks playThe Yahoo Dome, where Fukuoka's SoftBank Hawks play
The Yahoo Dome, where Fukuoka's SoftBank Hawks play21-Jul-2014 15:37, Canon Canon PowerShot ELPH 110 HS, 8.0, 4.3mm, 0.003 sec, ISO 200
 
The Japanese version of baseball stadium food: shrimp tempura udon (noodle soup) and takoyaki (diced octopus in a ball-shaped batter)The Japanese version of baseball stadium food: shrimp tempura udon (noodle soup) and takoyaki (diced octopus in a ball-shaped batter)
The Japanese version of baseball stadium food: shrimp tempura udon (noodle soup) and takoyaki (diced octopus in a ball-shaped batter)02-Sep-2014 16:24, Canon Canon PowerShot ELPH 110 HS, 3.2, 5.443mm, 0.005 sec, ISO 400
 
Getting beer from a beer girl - she has a pony keg strapped to her backGetting beer from a beer girl - she has a pony keg strapped to her back
Getting beer from a beer girl - she has a pony keg strapped to her back02-Sep-2014 17:17, Canon Canon PowerShot ELPH 110 HS, 2.7, 4.3mm, 0.017 sec, ISO 640
 
The "Honeys" are the SoftBanks cheerleading squadThe "Honeys" are the SoftBanks cheerleading squad
The "Honeys" are the SoftBanks cheerleading squad02-Sep-2014 18:52, Canon Canon PowerShot ELPH 110 HS, 5.9, 21.5mm, 0.02 sec, ISO 800
 
Bicycle parking at the Yahoo Dome - neat rows! no locks!Bicycle parking at the Yahoo Dome - neat rows! no locks!
Bicycle parking at the Yahoo Dome - neat rows! no locks!02-Sep-2014 15:51, Canon Canon PowerShot ELPH 110 HS, 2.7, 4.3mm, 0.003 sec, ISO 160
 
Fukuoka's Hard Rock Cafe, outside the Yahoo DomeFukuoka's Hard Rock Cafe, outside the Yahoo Dome
Fukuoka's Hard Rock Cafe, outside the Yahoo Dome02-Sep-2014 15:51, Canon Canon PowerShot ELPH 110 HS, 4.0, 7.507mm, 0.005 sec, ISO 200
 
A sign on the Shintencho shopping street, proclaiming the SoftBank Hawks victory in the Japan seriesA sign on the Shintencho shopping street, proclaiming the SoftBank Hawks victory in the Japan series
A sign on the Shintencho shopping street, proclaiming the SoftBank Hawks victory in the Japan series03-Nov-2014 13:41, Canon Canon PowerShot ELPH 110 HS, 2.7, 4.3mm, 0.033 sec, ISO 160
 
A sign for the SoftBank Hawks victory in the Pacific League Climax series, which means they go the final Japan SeriesA sign for the SoftBank Hawks victory in the Pacific League Climax series, which means they go the final Japan Series
A sign for the SoftBank Hawks victory in the Pacific League Climax series, which means they go the final Japan Series21-Oct-2014 11:05, Canon Canon PowerShot ELPH 110 HS, 2.7, 4.3mm, 0.005 sec, ISO 125
 

A Japanese Yo Yo Champion

Over the last couple weeks Eidan has become obsessed with yo-yoing. It’s pretty much all he does outside of school now. When his teacher found out, he introduced him to Tsukasa Ryu. He’s a senior at the same school the boys go to, and he’s one of Japan’s yo-yo champions (the school is K-12, and Eidan is in 3rd grade). He taught Eidan a trick the other day, and said he’ll teach him a new one each week if he keeps practicing. Eidan is awestruck – today he was talking about how strange it felt to know someone that he sees in videos of official competitions.

Here he is at this year’s Japan championship. I don’t know much about yo-yo tricks, but it’s amazing to watch.

Halloween in Japan


I shot this video at Kyoto station. The animation you’re seeing is on the steps between the 4th and 10th floors.

Japan, where cosplay is popular, is a natural fit for Halloween. But it has caught on here only in recent years. Apparently, Tokyo Disneyland gets most of the credit:

In 1997 Tokyo Disney had its first “Disney Happy Halloween” …As Japanese people already had a fascination with Disneyland, it was easy to make the concept of Halloween seem enchanting and magical. Every year after 1997 the Halloween celebration has grown as word of mouth has spread, and now the party starts as early as late September. Of course, Disney isn’t hogging the fun all to itself. In 2002, Universal Studios crashed the party and introduced “Hollywood Halloween,” another major success. Together, these two theme parks have contributed to bringing the Halloween tradition to Japan.

Based on what I’ve seen this past month, in Fukuoka, Osaka, and Kyoto, I think it’s safe to say that Halloween has evolved into a full-blown national event in Japan. The pictures below of people in costume are from our trip to the Universal Studios theme park a few weeks ago (the park has a Halloween celebration going for the entire month of October, so many people come in costume). On Halloween night, I walked the streets of our neighborhood here in Daimyo, which is the nightlife center of Fukuoka, and there were a lot of people dressed up in similar costumes. The majority of costumes were zombie themed, and most of the people dressed up were young women: zombie police girls, zombie Cinderellas, zombie schoolgirls, etc.

The Japan Times has a fantastic slideshow of people in costume if you want to see more. I believe they’re all in Tokyo.

Trick or treating is still fairly unknown here, however. People go to Halloween parties instead. The boys’ international school organized a small trick or treating route for the kids, which was nice. Eidan dressed up as a vampire, and had a great time. They were given a map of the neighborhood around the school, with a route and designated houses to visit, which had candy for the kids (these were mostly homes of foreigners living near the school, who already knew about Halloween).

Fukuoka Tower on HalloweenFukuoka Tower on Halloween
Fukuoka Tower on Halloween31-Oct-2014 18:27, Canon Canon PowerShot ELPH 110 HS, 5.6, 19.091mm, 0.125 sec, ISO 1600
 
Special Halloween burgers at McDonald'sSpecial Halloween burgers at McDonald's
Special Halloween burgers at McDonald's14-Oct-2014 17:18, Canon Canon PowerShot ELPH 110 HS, 2.7, 4.3mm, 0.025 sec, ISO 200
 
Halloween animation on the steps of Kyoto stationHalloween animation on the steps of Kyoto station
Halloween animation on the steps of Kyoto station23-Oct-2014 17:16, Canon Canon PowerShot ELPH 110 HS, 3.5, 5.7mm, 0.05 sec, ISO 1600
 
Halloween decoration at Kyoto stationHalloween decoration at Kyoto station
Halloween decoration at Kyoto station23-Oct-2014 17:28, Canon Canon PowerShot ELPH 110 HS, 2.7, 4.3mm, 0.033 sec, ISO 250
 
This grocery store in Fukuoka is ready for Halloween more than a month earlyThis grocery store in Fukuoka is ready for Halloween more than a month early
This grocery store in Fukuoka is ready for Halloween more than a month early25-Sep-2014 15:11, Canon Canon PowerShot ELPH 110 HS, 2.7, 4.3mm, 0.02 sec, ISO 200
 
The Loft department store's Halloween costume displayThe Loft department store's Halloween costume display
The Loft department store's Halloween costume display20-Sep-2014 13:09, Canon Canon PowerShot ELPH 110 HS, 2.7, 4.3mm, 0.017 sec, ISO 160
 
Girls dressed up for the month-long Halloween celebration at the Universal Studios theme parkGirls dressed up for the month-long Halloween celebration at the Universal Studios theme park
Girls dressed up for the month-long Halloween celebration at the Universal Studios theme park15-Oct-2014 14:49, Canon Canon PowerShot ELPH 110 HS, 2.7, 4.3mm, 0.006 sec, ISO 200
 
Girls dressed up for the month-long Halloween celebration at the Universal Studios theme parkGirls dressed up for the month-long Halloween celebration at the Universal Studios theme park
Girls dressed up for the month-long Halloween celebration at the Universal Studios theme park15-Oct-2014 11:37, Canon Canon PowerShot ELPH 110 HS, 2.7, 4.3mm, 0.002 sec, ISO 200
 
Girls dressed up for the month-long Halloween celebration at the Universal Studios theme parkGirls dressed up for the month-long Halloween celebration at the Universal Studios theme park
Girls dressed up for the month-long Halloween celebration at the Universal Studios theme park15-Oct-2014 11:35, Canon Canon PowerShot ELPH 110 HS, 2.7, 4.3mm, 0.001 sec, ISO 200
 

Osaka day 3: The Instant Ramen Museum and the Minoh Waterfall

Eidan enjoying the stream on the side of the road in MinohEidan enjoying the stream on the side of the road in Minoh
Eidan enjoying the stream on the side of the road in Minoh16-Oct-2014 13:55, Canon Canon PowerShot ELPH 110 HS, 2.7, 4.3mm, 0.033 sec, ISO 200
 

Instant ramen is serious business in Japan. Visiting the Momofuku Ando Instant Ramen Museum reminded me a little of visiting the Liberty Bell, in that there was a certain degree of reverence in the various displays. Momofuku Ando was the inventor of instant ramen, and they even have a life-size replica of the shack where he apparently worked endless hours to perfect the process of creating instant ramen. The boys favorite part was the mini-factory, where they could decorate their own personal cup of instant ramen noodles, and have it packaged with the broth and toppings of their choice.

The rest of the day was a very different experience – we visited the nearby small town of Minoh, for a hike to the Minoh waterfall. There were a couple opportunities along the way to go down to the stream, and Eidan was thrilled to have a chance to throw some rocks and sticks in the water. I realized that the boys haven’t spent much time away from cities since we arrived in Japan, aside from a few trips to the beach, so it made me especially glad we went.

Kai and his very impressive pancake breakfastKai and his very impressive pancake breakfast
Kai and his very impressive pancake breakfast16-Oct-2014 09:39, Canon Canon PowerShot ELPH 110 HS, 2.7, 4.3mm, 0.033 sec, ISO 320
 
At the Instant Ramen MuseumAt the Instant Ramen Museum
At the Instant Ramen Museum16-Oct-2014 11:22, Canon Canon PowerShot ELPH 110 HS, 8.0, 4.3mm, 0.006 sec, ISO 200
 
The history of instant ramenThe history of instant ramen
The history of instant ramen16-Oct-2014 11:28, Canon Canon PowerShot ELPH 110 HS, 2.7, 4.3mm, 0.013 sec, ISO 400
 
An old instant ramen vending machineAn old instant ramen vending machine
An old instant ramen vending machine16-Oct-2014 11:31, Canon Canon PowerShot ELPH 110 HS, 2.7, 4.3mm, 0.033 sec, ISO 640
 
Instant ramen in space!Instant ramen in space!
Instant ramen in space!16-Oct-2014 11:33, Canon Canon PowerShot ELPH 110 HS, 2.7, 4.3mm, 0.033 sec, ISO 640
 
The instant ramen history timelineThe instant ramen history timeline
The instant ramen history timeline16-Oct-2014 11:34, Canon Canon PowerShot ELPH 110 HS, 2.7, 4.3mm, 0.033 sec, ISO 250
 
The boys decorating their custom instant ramen containersThe boys decorating their custom instant ramen containers
The boys decorating their custom instant ramen containers16-Oct-2014 11:44, Canon Canon PowerShot ELPH 110 HS, 2.7, 4.3mm, 0.033 sec, ISO 500
 
The cup noodles factory - you can pick your own flavor and toppingsThe cup noodles factory - you can pick your own flavor and toppings
The cup noodles factory - you can pick your own flavor and toppings16-Oct-2014 12:03, Canon Canon PowerShot ELPH 110 HS, 2.7, 4.3mm, 0.033 sec, ISO 250
 
Outside the Minoh subway stationOutside the Minoh subway station
Outside the Minoh subway station16-Oct-2014 13:39, Canon Canon PowerShot ELPH 110 HS, 8.0, 4.3mm, 0.005 sec, ISO 100
 
A beer vending machine in Minoh - you don't see these often in Japan anymoreA beer vending machine in Minoh - you don't see these often in Japan anymore
A beer vending machine in Minoh - you don't see these often in Japan anymore16-Oct-2014 13:40, Canon Canon PowerShot ELPH 110 HS, 2.7, 4.3mm, 0.003 sec, ISO 125
 
The road leading to the Minoh waterfallThe road leading to the Minoh waterfall
The road leading to the Minoh waterfall16-Oct-2014 13:51, Canon Canon PowerShot ELPH 110 HS, 2.7, 4.3mm, 0.017 sec, ISO 200
 
Ryuanji Temple, on the way to the Minoh waterfallRyuanji Temple, on the way to the Minoh waterfall
Ryuanji Temple, on the way to the Minoh waterfall16-Oct-2014 14:11, Canon Canon PowerShot ELPH 110 HS, 2.7, 4.3mm, 0.003 sec, ISO 200
 
The boys near the road that leads to the Minoh waterfallThe boys near the road that leads to the Minoh waterfall
The boys near the road that leads to the Minoh waterfall16-Oct-2014 14:13, Canon Canon PowerShot ELPH 110 HS, 4.5, 8.285mm, 0.005 sec, ISO 160
 
A walkway near the Minoh waterfallA walkway near the Minoh waterfall
A walkway near the Minoh waterfall16-Oct-2014 14:29, Canon Canon PowerShot ELPH 110 HS, 2.7, 4.3mm, 0.033 sec, ISO 800
 
The Minoh waterfallThe Minoh waterfall
The Minoh waterfall16-Oct-2014 14:50, Canon Canon PowerShot ELPH 110 HS, 2.7, 4.3mm, 0.025 sec, ISO 200
 
Our Shinkansen bullet train, taking us back to Fukuoka from OsakaOur Shinkansen bullet train, taking us back to Fukuoka from Osaka
Our Shinkansen bullet train, taking us back to Fukuoka from Osaka16-Oct-2014 18:18, Canon Canon PowerShot ELPH 110 HS, 2.7, 4.3mm, 0.033 sec, ISO 320
 
Back at Hakata station in Fukuoka - can you imagine 30th St station being this clean?Back at Hakata station in Fukuoka - can you imagine 30th St station being this clean?
Back at Hakata station in Fukuoka - can you imagine 30th St station being this clean?16-Oct-2014 20:55, Canon Canon PowerShot ELPH 110 HS, 2.7, 4.3mm, 0.033 sec, ISO 320
 

Osaka day 2: The Universal Studios Theme Park

Girls dressed up for the month-long Halloween celebration at the Universal Studios theme parkGirls dressed up for the month-long Halloween celebration at the Universal Studios theme park
Girls dressed up for the month-long Halloween celebration at the Universal Studios theme park15-Oct-2014 14:49, Canon Canon PowerShot ELPH 110 HS, 2.7, 4.3mm, 0.006 sec, ISO 200
 

In 2007 we took the boys to Tokyo Disney, and visiting the Universal Studios theme park in Osaka last week was a similar experience. Both are replicas of their US counterparts, except of course everything is in Japanese. It’s great going to theme parks here, as they are in or near major cities, and are easy to get to by subway. So you can visit them without it having to be the major family expedition required for traveling to them in US.

The heart of the Universal Studios theme park is a fake city block that’s a replica of an American neighborhood. It actually triggered some mild reverse culture shock for me, since I’ve been away from the US for months now, and because of all the attention to detail, right down to the stop signs and ADA compliant curbs (wheelchair access is not well planned in most of Japan).

We went on a weekday, and it was still really crowded. But it was a fun crowd – they’re having a month-long Halloween celebration, and a lot of people came in costume.

In going through the park, it struck me that Universal Studios has a really mixed bag of movie properties, and almost all the attractions are based on movies from the 80s (Harry Potter being the only more recent one). There are attractions for some big hits, like Terminator, Jurassic Park, Jaws, and Back to the Future. But then there’s Water World and Chucky. I was happy to see that Woody Woodpecker is still alive and well in Japan though!

The crowd pouring out of the train to the Universal Studios theme park, on a weekdayThe crowd pouring out of the train to the Universal Studios theme park, on a weekday
The crowd pouring out of the train to the Universal Studios theme park, on a weekday15-Oct-2014 09:03, Canon Canon PowerShot ELPH 110 HS, 2.7, 4.3mm, 0.033 sec, ISO 640
 
Requisite photo in front of the Universal Studios logoRequisite photo in front of the Universal Studios logo
Requisite photo in front of the Universal Studios logo15-Oct-2014 09:15, Canon Canon PowerShot ELPH 110 HS, 8.0, 4.3mm, 0.004 sec, ISO 200
 
Cyberdyne Systems, from the Terminator moviesCyberdyne Systems, from the Terminator movies
Cyberdyne Systems, from the Terminator movies15-Oct-2014 09:40, Canon Canon PowerShot ELPH 110 HS, 3.5, 5.7mm, 0.001 sec, ISO 200
 
The Universal Studios theme park's re-creation of an American streetThe Universal Studios theme park's re-creation of an American street
The Universal Studios theme park's re-creation of an American street15-Oct-2014 10:27, Canon Canon PowerShot ELPH 110 HS, 8.0, 4.3mm, 0.003 sec, ISO 160
 
The crowd at "The Wizarding World of Harry Potter"The crowd at "The Wizarding World of Harry Potter"
The crowd at "The Wizarding World of Harry Potter"15-Oct-2014 10:39, Canon Canon PowerShot ELPH 110 HS, 8.0, 4.3mm, 0.002 sec, ISO 200
 
The mail room in HogwartsThe mail room in Hogwarts
The mail room in Hogwarts15-Oct-2014 10:44, Canon Canon PowerShot ELPH 110 HS, 2.7, 4.3mm, 0.033 sec, ISO 500
 
Hogwarts CastleHogwarts Castle
Hogwarts Castle15-Oct-2014 10:50, Canon Canon PowerShot ELPH 110 HS, 8.0, 4.3mm, 0.003 sec, ISO 160
 
Girls dressed up for the month-long Halloween celebration at the Universal Studios theme parkGirls dressed up for the month-long Halloween celebration at the Universal Studios theme park
Girls dressed up for the month-long Halloween celebration at the Universal Studios theme park15-Oct-2014 11:35, Canon Canon PowerShot ELPH 110 HS, 2.7, 4.3mm, 0.001 sec, ISO 200
 
Girls dressed up for the month-long Halloween celebration at the Universal Studios theme parkGirls dressed up for the month-long Halloween celebration at the Universal Studios theme park
Girls dressed up for the month-long Halloween celebration at the Universal Studios theme park15-Oct-2014 11:37, Canon Canon PowerShot ELPH 110 HS, 2.7, 4.3mm, 0.002 sec, ISO 200
 
Woody Woodpecker is alive and well in JapanWoody Woodpecker is alive and well in Japan
Woody Woodpecker is alive and well in Japan15-Oct-2014 12:18, Canon Canon PowerShot ELPH 110 HS, 8.0, 4.3mm, 0.001 sec, ISO 100
 
"Spider-men" instant noodles ("men" means noodles in Japanese)"Spider-men" instant noodles ("men" means noodles in Japanese)
"Spider-men" instant noodles ("men" means noodles in Japanese)15-Oct-2014 12:44, Canon Canon PowerShot ELPH 110 HS, 2.7, 4.3mm, 0.017 sec, ISO 500
 
Outside the Back to the Future rideOutside the Back to the Future ride
Outside the Back to the Future ride15-Oct-2014 12:56, Canon Canon PowerShot ELPH 110 HS, 8.0, 4.3mm, 0.003 sec, ISO 200
 
A raptor wandering outside the Jurassic Park rideA raptor wandering outside the Jurassic Park ride
A raptor wandering outside the Jurassic Park ride15-Oct-2014 14:22, Canon Canon PowerShot ELPH 110 HS, 2.7, 4.3mm, 0.002 sec, ISO 200
 
The Water World showThe Water World show
The Water World show15-Oct-2014 15:04, Canon Canon PowerShot ELPH 110 HS, 2.7, 4.3mm, 0.002 sec, ISO 320
 
The doctor is inThe doctor is in
The doctor is in15-Oct-2014 16:23, Canon Canon PowerShot ELPH 110 HS, 4.5, 9.324mm, 0.04 sec, ISO 800
 
Mel's Drive-In, at the Universal Studios theme parkMel's Drive-In, at the Universal Studios theme park
Mel's Drive-In, at the Universal Studios theme park15-Oct-2014 16:48, Canon Canon PowerShot ELPH 110 HS, 2.7, 4.3mm, 0.033 sec, ISO 640
 
The Universal Studios theme park at nightThe Universal Studios theme park at night
The Universal Studios theme park at night15-Oct-2014 17:28, Canon Canon PowerShot ELPH 110 HS, 2.7, 4.3mm, 0.125 sec, ISO 1600
 

Osaka day 1: The Kaiyukan Aquarium and Dōtonbori

The boys were on Fall break from school last week, and we had plans to take a vacation in Okinawa, but Super Typhoon Vongfong made sure that didn’t happen. So we went to Osaka for a few days instead, after the typhoon had finally passed through Japan. The boys had their first Shinkansen (bullet train) ride: we traveled the roughy 380 miles from Fukuoka to Osaka in 2 and half hours. To give you a US comparison, it’s about 310 miles from Boston to Philadelphia, and Amtrak can get you there in about 5 hours and 40 minutes.

We visited the Osaka aquarium in the afternoon, and then spent the evening in the Dōtonbori shopping area. We splashed out on a couple nights at the very posh Osaka Marriott Miyako Hotel.

I’ll let the pictures tell you the rest…

The level below the Shinkansen platform at Hakata station. I'm still not used to the amazing cleanliness of Fukuoka's public spaces.The level below the Shinkansen platform at Hakata station. I'm still not used to the amazing cleanliness of Fukuoka's public spaces.
The level below the Shinkansen platform at Hakata station. I'm still not used to the amazing cleanliness of Fukuoka's public spaces.14-Oct-2014 07:54, Canon Canon PowerShot ELPH 110 HS, 2.7, 4.3mm, 0.025 sec, ISO 200
 
Eidan enjoying his kids' eki bento on the shinkansen to OsakaEidan enjoying his kids' eki bento on the shinkansen to Osaka
Eidan enjoying his kids' eki bento on the shinkansen to Osaka14-Oct-2014 07:57, Canon Canon PowerShot ELPH 110 HS, 2.7, 4.3mm, 0.013 sec, ISO 800
 
My eki bento on the Shinkansen ride to OsakaMy eki bento on the Shinkansen ride to Osaka
My eki bento on the Shinkansen ride to Osaka14-Oct-2014 08:01, Canon Canon PowerShot ELPH 110 HS, 2.7, 4.3mm, 0.033 sec, ISO 250
 
Kai is not sure sure about his melon soda and vanilla ice cream floatKai is not sure sure about his melon soda and vanilla ice cream float
Kai is not sure sure about his melon soda and vanilla ice cream float14-Oct-2014 12:07, Canon Canon PowerShot ELPH 110 HS, 2.7, 4.3mm, 0.033 sec, ISO 320
 
Eidan looking like a character from a Dicken's novel after trying his black vanilla bean ice creamEidan looking like a character from a Dicken's novel after trying his black vanilla bean ice cream
Eidan looking like a character from a Dicken's novel after trying his black vanilla bean ice cream14-Oct-2014 12:12, Canon Canon PowerShot ELPH 110 HS, 2.7, 4.3mm, 0.033 sec, ISO 320
 
The Osaka aquariumThe Osaka aquarium
The Osaka aquarium14-Oct-2014 12:28, Canon Canon PowerShot ELPH 110 HS, 3.5, 6.216mm, 0.002 sec, ISO 200
 
Osaka Aquarium KaiyukanOsaka Aquarium Kaiyukan
Osaka Aquarium Kaiyukan14-Oct-2014 13:06, Canon Canon PowerShot ELPH 110 HS, 2.7, 4.3mm, 0.05 sec, ISO 800
 
Eidan at the Osaka Aquarium KaiyukanEidan at the Osaka Aquarium Kaiyukan
Eidan at the Osaka Aquarium Kaiyukan14-Oct-2014 13:30, Canon Canon PowerShot ELPH 110 HS, 2.7, 4.3mm, 0.125 sec, ISO 1600
 
Jellyfish at the Osaka Aquarium KaiyukanJellyfish at the Osaka Aquarium Kaiyukan
Jellyfish at the Osaka Aquarium Kaiyukan14-Oct-2014 13:36, Canon Canon PowerShot ELPH 110 HS, 2.7, 4.3mm, 0.05 sec, ISO 1250
 
View from our room at the Osaka Marriott Miyako HotelView from our room at the Osaka Marriott Miyako Hotel
View from our room at the Osaka Marriott Miyako Hotel14-Oct-2014 15:17, Canon Canon PowerShot ELPH 110 HS, 2.7, 4.3mm, 0.001 sec, ISO 200
 
Osaka's Dōtonbori shopping areaOsaka's Dōtonbori shopping area
Osaka's Dōtonbori shopping area14-Oct-2014 17:05, Canon Canon PowerShot ELPH 110 HS, 2.7, 4.3mm, 0.02 sec, ISO 200
 
Osaka's Dōtonbori shopping areaOsaka's Dōtonbori shopping area
Osaka's Dōtonbori shopping area14-Oct-2014 17:06, Canon Canon PowerShot ELPH 110 HS, 2.7, 4.3mm, 0.033 sec, ISO 320
 
A marketing campaign that speaks to me ;-)A marketing campaign that speaks to me ;-)
A marketing campaign that speaks to me ;-)14-Oct-2014 17:11, Canon Canon PowerShot ELPH 110 HS, 2.7, 4.3mm, 0.008 sec, ISO 400
 
Suds creature!Suds creature!
Suds creature!14-Oct-2014 17:18, Canon Canon PowerShot ELPH 110 HS, 2.7, 4.3mm, 0.025 sec, ISO 200
 
Outside a restaurant in Osaka's Dōtonbori shopping areaOutside a restaurant in Osaka's Dōtonbori shopping area
Outside a restaurant in Osaka's Dōtonbori shopping area14-Oct-2014 17:23, Canon Canon PowerShot ELPH 110 HS, 2.7, 4.3mm, 0.02 sec, ISO 800
 
Bicycle spotted in Osaka's Shinsaibashi SujiBicycle spotted in Osaka's Shinsaibashi Suji
Bicycle spotted in Osaka's Shinsaibashi Suji14-Oct-2014 17:29, Canon Canon PowerShot ELPH 110 HS, 3.5, 6.216mm, 0.067 sec, ISO 1600
 
Osaka street urchinsOsaka street urchins
Osaka street urchins14-Oct-2014 18:19, Canon Canon PowerShot ELPH 110 HS, 2.7, 4.3mm, 0.05 sec, ISO 1000
 
Eidan enjoying some chili cheese fries in Osaka's DōtonboriEidan enjoying some chili cheese fries in Osaka's Dōtonbori
Eidan enjoying some chili cheese fries in Osaka's Dōtonbori14-Oct-2014 18:27, Canon Canon PowerShot ELPH 110 HS, 2.7, 4.3mm, 0.04 sec, ISO 800
 
A manhole cover in OsakaA manhole cover in Osaka
A manhole cover in Osaka14-Oct-2014 18:35, Canon Canon PowerShot ELPH 110 HS, 2.7, 4.3mm, 0.05 sec, ISO 1000
 
Osaka's Dōtonbori shopping areaOsaka's Dōtonbori shopping area
Osaka's Dōtonbori shopping area14-Oct-2014 18:39, Canon Canon PowerShot ELPH 110 HS, 3.5, 5.958mm, 0.033 sec, ISO 500
 
The lobby of the Osaka Marriott Miyako HotelThe lobby of the Osaka Marriott Miyako Hotel
The lobby of the Osaka Marriott Miyako Hotel14-Oct-2014 19:36, Canon Canon PowerShot ELPH 110 HS, 2.7, 4.3mm, 0.04 sec, ISO 800
 
View from our room at the Osaka Marriott Miyako HotelView from our room at the Osaka Marriott Miyako Hotel
View from our room at the Osaka Marriott Miyako Hotel14-Oct-2014 19:39, Canon Canon PowerShot ELPH 110 HS, 2.7, 4.3mm, 0.125 sec, ISO 1600
 

You have to watch out for the cops here in Fukuoka. Some of them are tough characters.

You have to watch out for the cops here. Some of them are tough characters.
You have to watch out for the cops here. Some of them are tough characters.10-Oct-2014 14:27, Canon Canon PowerShot ELPH 110 HS, 2.7, 4.3mm, 0.008 sec, ISO 100
 

I took this picture as Eidan and I were walking by the police station near his school. His school is near another elementary school, so they were probably going there to give a safety presentation.

Super Typhoon Vongfong

Typhoon Vongfong is due to hit Okinawa right around the time we're scheduled to fly there, for the boys' Fall break
Typhoon Vongfong is due to hit Okinawa right around the time we're scheduled to fly there, for the boys' Fall break09-Oct-2014 10:01
 

The eye of Super Typhoon Vongfong is due to hit Okinawa right around the time our flight is scheduled to land there on Saturday. It’s the strongest storm so far this year:

Typhoon Vongfong is the strongest tropical cyclone since last year’s Typhoon Haiyan, which had winds of 315 km/h (195 mph) which devastated parts of the Philippines, leaving over 6,000 dead and more than 1,800 missing.

Currently over open water, the storm, which is classed as a Super Typhoon, is heading north towards the Japanese island prefecture of Okinawa, according to the Hawaii-based Joint Typhoon Warning Center (JTWC).

The outermost edge of the storm has already reached Okinawa. We were planning to go there for the boys’ Fall break. It’s a category 5 storm right now, but it’s supposed to weaken considerably by the time it gets to Okinawa, so hopefully it won’t cause many injuries or too much damage. We’ll figure out our travel plans tomorrow, after we see how the storm progresses in the next 24 hours.

This is a little bit too reminiscent of my flight to Fukuoka with the boys in July.

Interestingly, the news in Japan never refers to the typhoons by name. This is typhoon 19.

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