The Nagoshi-sai (Summer passage rite) festival at Hakozaki shrine

The Hakozaki shrine at sunset, during the Nagoshi-sai (summer passage rite)The Hakozaki shrine at sunset, during the Nagoshi-sai (summer passage rite)
The Hakozaki shrine at sunset, during the Nagoshi-sai (summer passage rite)26-Jul-2014 18:01, Canon Canon PowerShot ELPH 110 HS, 5.0, 10.889mm, 0.02 sec, ISO 100
 
The street leading to Hakozaki shrine, during the Nagoshi-sai (summer passage rite)The street leading to Hakozaki shrine, during the Nagoshi-sai (summer passage rite)
The street leading to Hakozaki shrine, during the Nagoshi-sai (summer passage rite)26-Jul-2014 17:40, Canon Canon PowerShot ELPH 110 HS, 3.5, 6.474mm, 0.005 sec, ISO 100
 

The Hakozaki shrine has 3 major festivals each year, and no less than a dozen smaller ones. Last month we attended one of the smaller ones, the Nagoshi-sai (summer passage rite).

The festival site, the Hakozaki shrine, is known as one of the three major Hachiman shrines in Japan. It is said to have been founded during the Heian period in the 10th century. The guardian deity is the spirit of the Emperor Ojin, who was born in what is now Umi-machi in Fukuoka Prefecture. His placenta was placed in a box and kept here, and a pine tree was planted on the site as a symbol of it…

The most visually striking part of the shrine is the splendid Sakura gate in front of the main hall. It covers only 12 tsubo of ground area at the base, but the roof extends over a magnificent 83 tsubo. The tower gate has bright gold-frame calligraphy with the inscription, “The surrender of the enemy nation”. At the end of the fierce battles that occurred during the Mongol invasion of the 13th century, the enemy fleet was destroyed by a storm that came to be known as the divine wind, or kamikaze. The calligraphy is said to have been dedicated by the Emperor Daijo Kameyama for the reconstruction of the shrine, which was burned down during the invasion. Since then, many military commanders have visited the site to receive good luck on the battlefield.

Earlier I wrote about the food at the Nishinihon Ohori festival, and this was a similar experience: plenty of beer and soda, and slightly-expensive-but-not-outrageously-priced grilled, yummy food, mostly on sticks, so they’re easy to eat while walking. We went with my Japanese tutor and her boyfriend, and some of their friends, so we had a group to hang out with.

There were two long lines of people at the shrine. One line to enter the shrine, for blessings from the monks, and another line to walk through a round gate made of some type of grass, for good luck. There was a sign with instructions on how to go through it properly: you actually go through it 3 times, looping once to the left, then to the right, and then back to the left again.

The evening ended with a taiko drumming performance put on by a children’s group. They were pretty good!

In a couple weeks it will be the site of the Hojoya festival, which is not only a major festival for the shrine, but it considered one of the top 3 annual festivals for all of Fukuoka. So we will back!

Fish on a stick, at the Nagoshi-sai festivalFish on a stick, at the Nagoshi-sai festival
Fish on a stick, at the Nagoshi-sai festival26-Jul-2014 17:53, Canon Canon PowerShot ELPH 110 HS, 2.7, 4.3mm, 0.01 sec, ISO 200
 
Overpriced masks for the kids, at the Nagoshi-sai festivalOverpriced masks for the kids, at the Nagoshi-sai festival
Overpriced masks for the kids, at the Nagoshi-sai festival26-Jul-2014 17:56, Canon Canon PowerShot ELPH 110 HS, 2.7, 4.3mm, 0.017 sec, ISO 200
 
The entrance to Hakozaki shrine at sunset, during the Nagoshi-sai (summer passage rite)The entrance to Hakozaki shrine at sunset, during the Nagoshi-sai (summer passage rite)
The entrance to Hakozaki shrine at sunset, during the Nagoshi-sai (summer passage rite)26-Jul-2014 17:56, Canon Canon PowerShot ELPH 110 HS, 4.5, 9.324mm, 0.017 sec, ISO 200
 
Why not? Some hula dancing at the Hakozaki shrine, during the Nagoshi-sai (summer passage rite)Why not? Some hula dancing at the Hakozaki shrine, during the Nagoshi-sai (summer passage rite)
Why not? Some hula dancing at the Hakozaki shrine, during the Nagoshi-sai (summer passage rite)26-Jul-2014 18:04, Canon Canon PowerShot ELPH 110 HS, 2.7, 4.3mm, 0.033 sec, ISO 640
 
People walking through the festival gate 3 times at Hakozaki shrine for luck (looping to the left, to the right, and then left again)People walking through the festival gate 3 times at Hakozaki shrine for luck (looping to the left, to the right, and then left again)
People walking through the festival gate 3 times at Hakozaki shrine for luck (looping to the left, to the right, and then left again)26-Jul-2014 18:11, Canon Canon PowerShot ELPH 110 HS, 2.7, 4.3mm, 0.025 sec, ISO 200
 

Costco pilgrimage

The Fukuoka Costco
The Fukuoka Costco27-Aug-2014 12:47, Canon Canon PowerShot ELPH 110 HS, 8.0, 4.3mm, 0.003 sec, ISO 200
 

Yesterday I had a reverse culture shock experience, visiting the Costco on the outskirts of Fukuoka. My Japanese tutor’s boyfriend has a membership, and I took them up on their offer to go shopping with them after my lesson. It was just like visiting Costco in the US, right down to the prominent USDA beef sign on the wall in the meat section, which I’m sure means absolutely nothing to the Japanese. It was so eerily similar that I imagined some impossibly large Costco airship flying across the Pacific from the US, with an entire prefab Costco warehouse dangling underneath it on straps, and then gently lowering it onto the ground in Fukuoka. They even had some overweight white people wandering the aisles, to make me feel right at home. I’ve been here for almost two months now, which is long enough for it to feel simultaneously comforting and disorienting to be in a place that feels just like it’s in the US.

For the first time ever, I felt thrilled to be surrounded by Kirkland food products. I could not indulge in an engorging shopping spree, however. My purchases would have to fit in the back of my tutor’s small car (along with her purchases), and I had to finish the trip home on a bus, so I had to be able to carry it all. And finally, we have absolutely no storage space in our microscopic apartment. That box of 72 frozen waffles I wanted? Nope – it was bigger than our freezer. The case of 24 liters of soy milk that lasts forever? Nope – too heavy, and nowhere to put it all when I got home. You get the idea.

My tutor’s boyfriend told me he knew someone who worked for Costco when they were first opening stores in Japan about 8 years ago, and he said they had a lot of difficulty at first attracting customers. This is because the Costco shopping experience is antithetical to how most Japanese shop: they typically don’t have a lot of storage space, they don’t eat large amounts of packaged food or frozen food, and most neighborhoods have good grocery stores, so it’s easy to do day-to-day shopping for fresh food. I don’t know exactly what’s changed since then, but Costco is doing well here now. There are currently 21 Costco stores in Japan. He told me they don’t shop there on weekends, because it’s way too busy. It was crowded while we were there too, in the middle of the afternoon on a Wednesday. A likely reason is that about one third of the products looked like they were selected specifically for the Japanese market: big trays of fresh sushi, rice cookers, etc.

We had lunch at the Costco food court, which served exactly the same food as in the US: hot dogs and pizza. I’ve never enjoyed a slice of greasy Costco supreme pizza so much, but I felt mildly sick a few hours later. After two months of eating a mostly Japanese diet, my body has apparently already acclimated to me not regularly poisoning it anymore.

For my shopping, I focused on things I hoped I could carry, that would be most appreciated by the family: a container of bite size brownies for the boys, 16 bagels (bagels!!!), a couple jugs of apple juice (heavy, but I couldn’t resist: Eidan loves apples juice, but he doesn’t like the taste of Japanese apple juice as much), some oranges that didn’t cost an arm and leg, a rotisserie chicken for dinner (I’ve never seen these in Japan before), a massive bottle of Jack Daniels for Maria, and a few other sundry items.

I borrowed a big duffle bag to get it all home. It practically tore my shoulders off while I did the quarter mile walk from the bus stop to our apartment, but the look on the boys’ faces made it worth it, when they saw the brownies and bagels :-)

Pharrell Williams – HAPPY We are from Fukuoka, Japan

Last month the Fukuoka version of Happy went up on Youtube:

I watched a handful of versions from other Japanese cities. Fukuoka’s is the best I’ve seen so far, except for maybe Harajuku’s.

In case you’ve been living under a rock:

The song has been highly successful, peaking at number one in the United States, United Kingdom, Canada, Ireland, New Zealand, and 19 other countries… To coincide with the single release, the website 24hoursofhappy.com was launched featuring a visual presentation of “Happy” advertised as being “the world’s first 24 hour music video”. The video consists of the four-minute song repeated with various people dancing around Los Angeles and miming along… The original video spawned many cover videos on YouTube in which people from different cities throughout the world dance to the song. Those videos are usually called “Pharrell Williams – Happy – We Are from [name of the city]“.[40] As of May 2014, more than 1,500 videos had been created…

The Chuo Ward office: navigating Japanese government bureaucracy and turning down free money

Inside the Chuo Ward officeInside the Chuo Ward office
Inside the Chuo Ward office30-Jul-2014 11:22, Canon Canon PowerShot ELPH 110 HS, 2.7, 4.3mm, 0.02 sec, ISO 200
 

Since we’re here in Fukuoka for 6 months, we’re not just here as tourists – we’re staying on a work visa through Maria’s fellowship. When the boys and I came through the immigration counter at the airport, we were given foreign resident cards. But that was only the first step. We were told we had 2 weeks to register at our local ward office.

Maria came here a month before us, so she had already done the paperwork for herself. They don’t provide services in English at the ward office, so Maria came with me and the boys to help us through the process. When we arrived, the office was – like everything else in Japan – immaculate, and while it definitely screamed “boring government bureaucracy,” it at least came across as an efficient one.

The water fountain in front of the Chuo Ward office, which shows the timeThe water fountain in front of the Chuo Ward office, which shows the time
The water fountain in front of the Chuo Ward office, which shows the time20-Aug-2014 15:33, Canon Canon PowerShot ELPH 110 HS, 2.7, 4.3mm, 0.013 sec, ISO 200
 

Also worth mentioning is the water fountain out front, featuring statues of two little boys peeing, and the fountain itself displays the current time. Interestingly, you don’t even notice the time when you look at it, so seeing it there startled me when it showed up so clearly in the photo. I don’t know if this is an intentional “trick art” design or not (trick art is popular here – it refers to visual effects that only appear when you take a picture of something).

Once inside and at the forms counter, there was only one form I saw with any English on it, which said it was for foreign resident registration, but the staff directed Maria towards a change of address form. I was almost certain this was a mistake, but it turned out to be the right form after all. Dealing with government forms and official language is a challenge even for Maria. Even though she is nearly fluent, dealing with government agencies involves a lot of very formal grammar and uncommon words.

After filling out the form and taking a number, we only had to wait briefly before sitting down with someone. We ended up having to re-do part of the form: we didn’t have a marriage certificate with us, so we couldn’t register as a married couple. After we straightened that out, the boys and I left, and Maria stayed for what she expected to be only a short time, to finish up some paperwork for the boys.

She ended up not getting home until about 2 hours later. They sent her to several different stations in the office, having her fill out forms that were about insurance for the boys, etc. They were saying she needed a Japanese bank account, but we don’t have one, and it’s a pain for foreigners to get bank accounts here. Maria was getting frustrated and asked if she could just pay directly for the insurance. She told me the woman behind the counter gave her a look of bewildered surprise at that point, and said, “we want your bank account information so WE can give YOU money.” Japanese citizens are given a monthly subsidy (basically a cash handout) to help support their children. As we found out later, the subsidies were introduced in 2009 to encourage people to have children, as Japan has an unsustainably low birthrate. It turns out foreigners are eligible for this too, even people like us who are staying for just half a year.

Maria made an initial attempt to turn it down, and the woman encouraged her to go ahead and do the paperwork, telling her “it’s free money!” Maria then insisted, “I don’t want to waste the Japanese taxpayers money,” to which the woman responded, “well, thank you very much!”

We’re not sure exactly what the stipend would have been, but it probably was in the neighborhood of $100 – $150 per month for each of the boys. The kicker is, since we couldn’t register as a married couple, Maria was eligible for additional money as a single mother. This was probably around another $100/month per child.

Would you have turned down the money?

Life size cardboard replica of a D51 locomotive

The D51 locomotive - a full scale replica in cardboard
The D51 locomotive - a full scale replica in cardboard15-Jul-2014 11:20, Canon Canon PowerShot ELPH 110 HS, 2.7, 4.3mm, 0.033 sec, ISO 320
 
The D51 locomotive - a full scale replica in cardboard
The D51 locomotive - a full scale replica in cardboard15-Jul-2014 11:21, Canon Canon PowerShot ELPH 110 HS, 2.7, 4.3mm, 0.033 sec, ISO 400
 

A few weeks ago we saw the full scale cardboard replica of a D51 locomotive:

Nagasaki resident and artist Shima Hideo used a total of 4,000 pieces of cardboard to create the whole piece, which is 2.9 meters wide, 12.5 meters long, 4 meters tall, and made up of over 1,500 separate parts. The exhibition is touring the country… Seeing the artwork up-close, you’ll be amazed by the detail created from cardboard.

We stumbled across it as we passed through the main hall of the 14 story IMS building, which is attached to the shopping mega-complex that surrounds our neighborhood’s Tenjin station.

Anything and everything to do with trains is a popular hobby in Japan – much more so than in the US – since trains and subways are the primary mode of transportation here.

Every time they move the train to a new location, they have to disassemble it and reassemble it. There’s a great time lapse video on the Asahi Shimbun site showing the process (unfortunately there are security restrictions on the video, so I can’t embed it here).

Note that the artist who created it, Shima Hideo, is not to be confused with the Shima Hideo who invented the world’s first bullet train, the Shinkansen, and died in 1998.

Obon Week and the Gokoku Shrine’s Mitama Matsuri

This past week was the time for Obon in Japan:

Obon (お盆?) or just Bon (盆?) is a Japanese Buddhist custom to honor the spirits of one’s ancestors. This Buddhist-Confucian custom has evolved into a family reunion holiday during which people return to ancestral family places and visit and clean their ancestors’ graves, and when the spirits of ancestors are supposed to revisit the household altars. It has been celebrated in Japan for more than 500 years and traditionally includes a dance, known as Bon-Odori.

Most companies shut down for most of the week, so people can return to their hometowns. The Wall Street journal reported that Tokyo was deserted. In contrast, our Daimyo neighborhood in Fukuoka was packed. During every weekday afternoon this past week, the streets and shops were as crowded as a typical Saturday night.

The nearby Gokoku shrine had their own Obon related festival going on this week, every night from Wednesday to Saturday:

Six thousand lanterns illuminate the shrine grounds for this festival of light, giving thanks to one’s ancestors and those who have died in war. Live stage with Japanese drumming, gospel and more, plus a mini flea market, and stalls selling all sorts of matsuri foods.

We paid a visit last night. The festival itself was modest, with about a dozen or so stalls selling food and various arts and crafts. The main attraction was the thousands of lanterns, many of which had unique, hand-painted designs.

Gokoku Shrine Mitama Matsuri
Gokoku Shrine Mitama Matsuri16-Aug-2014 17:22, Canon Canon PowerShot ELPH 110 HS, 3.2, 5.443mm, 0.033 sec, ISO 200
 
The lanterns on display at the Gokoku Shrine Mitama Matsuri
The lanterns on display at the Gokoku Shrine Mitama Matsuri16-Aug-2014 17:29, Canon Canon PowerShot ELPH 110 HS, 2.7, 4.3mm, 0.008 sec, ISO 200
 
The lanterns on display at the Gokoku Shrine Mitama Matsuri
The lanterns on display at the Gokoku Shrine Mitama Matsuri16-Aug-2014 17:33, Canon Canon PowerShot ELPH 110 HS, 2.7, 4.3mm, 0.013 sec, ISO 200
 
The lanterns on display at the Gokoku Shrine Mitama Matsuri
The lanterns on display at the Gokoku Shrine Mitama Matsuri16-Aug-2014 17:33, Canon Canon PowerShot ELPH 110 HS, 2.7, 4.3mm, 0.017 sec, ISO 200
 
The lanterns on display at the Gokoku Shrine Mitama Matsuri
The lanterns on display at the Gokoku Shrine Mitama Matsuri16-Aug-2014 17:28, Canon Canon PowerShot ELPH 110 HS, 2.7, 4.3mm, 0.017 sec, ISO 125
 

Kamakiri Udon: good udon, free beer

There may be no such thing as a free lunch, but there is free beer. It comes in a very small glass though.

Free, very small glasses of beer at Kamakiri UdonFree, very small glasses of beer at Kamakiri Udon
Free, very small glasses of beer at Kamakiri Udon16-Aug-2014 18:42, Canon Canon PowerShot ELPH 110 HS, 2.7, 4.3mm, 0.04 sec, ISO 800
 

We’ve had dinner a couple times now at one of our neighborhood udon shops, Kamakiri Udon:

…The noodles, which are made in-house from Itoshima flour, are soft yet resilient and retain a slightly wheaty flavor. You can enjoy them in warm bowl of flavorful broth or cold with the dipping sauce on the side. Kamakiri Udon offers the best of both the Sanuki and Hakata styles of udon. The donburi include the perennial favorites—katsudon, oyakodon and tendon—and you can also order a mini size (¥300~) to go with your udon. Last but not least, don’t miss the eye-catching “free small glass of beer anytime”. As the name suggests, you can order one glass of beer at no charge, day or night…

The small free beer, of course, entices you to buy a full glass, which we have done faithfully :-)

The udon is superb, and so is the donburi and tempura. The challenge is that the shop is very small, with only a bar counter and 4 tables, so you have to go during off-peak hours if you don’t want to wait.

The menu has no pictures, and no English, so you need to be ready to communicate in Japanese. It was a month between our first visit and our most recent visit, and I noticed my ability to read the menu improved considerably in that time. I still can’t read the kanji characters, but I was able to decipher about one-third of the menu.

For more pictures, and contact and location information, see Fukuoka Now.

Gobo tempura udon (gobo is burdock root)Gobo tempura udon (gobo is burdock root)
Gobo tempura udon (gobo is burdock root)16-Jul-2014 19:35, HTC EVO, 2.0, 3.63mm, 0.05 sec, ISO 453
 
Waiting outside Kamakiri UdonWaiting outside Kamakiri Udon
Waiting outside Kamakiri Udon16-Aug-2014 18:13, Canon Canon PowerShot ELPH 110 HS, 2.7, 4.3mm, 0.033 sec, ISO 640
 

Something lost in translation, perhaps?

Spotted in a nearby department store, which is actually not far from this store.

Update: I decided to look this up. They actually have a cartoon Doctor mascot (it looks like that’s his face on the top of the box). It turns out the name is supposed to be short for “assembly.” But as always, the Japanese never seem to bother checking with a native speaker when they name their products in English.

Something lost in translation, perhaps?
Something lost in translation, perhaps?26-Jul-2014 16:31, Canon Canon PowerShot ELPH 110 HS, 2.7, 4.3mm, 0.033 sec, ISO 100
 

Senior glasses

I was noticing how small and hard to read the Japanese characters were in my textbook. But it’s not the book – it’s my eyes. Here in Japan, they call a spade a spade (at least with some things – definitely not with others). I have bought “senior glasses.”

“Senior moments” will be next.

The time has come for these... :-(The time has come for these... :-(
The time has come for these... :-(07-Aug-2014 15:13, Canon Canon PowerShot ELPH 110 HS, 2.7, 4.3mm, 0.033 sec, ISO 500
 

A day in Dazaifu

A wedding procession at the Dazaifu Tenmangu ShrineA wedding procession at the Dazaifu Tenmangu Shrine
A wedding procession at the Dazaifu Tenmangu Shrine20-Jul-2014 13:46, Canon Canon PowerShot ELPH 110 HS, 4.0, 7.507mm, 0.001 sec, ISO 100
 
The Kyushu National MuseumThe Kyushu National Museum
The Kyushu National Museum20-Jul-2014 14:00, Canon Canon PowerShot ELPH 110 HS, 2.7, 4.3mm, 0.001 sec, ISO 100
 
Eidan in the Dazaifu samurai shopEidan in the Dazaifu samurai shop
Eidan in the Dazaifu samurai shop20-Jul-2014 15:16, Canon Canon PowerShot ELPH 110 HS, 2.7, 4.3mm, 0.033 sec, ISO 320
 

We visited the small town of Dazaifu a few weeks ago (I’m just getting around to writing about it now!). Dazaifu is about a 30 minute train ride from Fukuoka, and it’s a popular tourist day trip destination. It’s most well known for the Tenmangu Shrine and the Kyushu National Museum.

About 1,500 years ago, Dazaifu was the site of the imperial office at the head of the government overseeing Kyushu, making it a major regional government center–at that time, equivalent to a national government, because Japan was not yet a unified “nation” by any means. Foreign ambassadors from Korea and China stayed in Dazaifu on many occasions. During the Nara and Heian Periods, Dazaifu became a place of exile for court nobles, including the highly regarded poet and scholar Sugawara no Michizane…

When Michizane died in the early tenth century, many natural disasters occurred, and people assumed this was his spirit taking revenge for being wronged. The Tenmangu Shrine was built on the site of Michizane’s grave, and offerings were made to him to in an attempt to prevent further calamities.

Today, because the Tenmangu Shrines are related to scholarship, many students visit and rub the heads of bull statues (said to make you more intelligent) before praying at the shrines for success in studies or examinations. The shrine is also famous for its approximately 6,000 beautiful plum blossoms, which bloom in February…

People checking their o-mikuji at the Dazaifu shrinePeople checking their o-mikuji at the Dazaifu shrine
People checking their o-mikuji at the Dazaifu shrine20-Jul-2014 13:38, Canon Canon PowerShot ELPH 110 HS, 3.5, 5.958mm, 0.001 sec, ISO 100
 

We went on a sunny Sunday afternoon and the shrine grounds were crowded. People were busy offering prayers, rubbing the bull heads, and checking their o-mikuji (fortunes). You pay 100 yen (about a dollar) for an omikuji, and if you get a bad one, the tradition is to tie up and leave it. You can see in the picture people buying them on the left, and tying them up on the right. I just learned from Wikipedia how this tradition originated:

When the prediction is bad, it is a custom to fold up the strip of paper and attach it to a pine tree or a wall of metal wires alongside other bad fortunes in the temple or shrine grounds. A purported reason for this custom is a pun on the word for pine tree (松 matsu) and the verb ‘to wait’ (待つ matsu), the idea being that the bad luck will wait by the tree rather than attach itself to the bearer.

We were lucky enough to see a wedding procession at the Shrine while we were there. After that we took an escalator up the side of a steep hill, which leads to the Kyushu National Museum. Kyushu is the southernmost of Japan’s four largest islands, and Fukuoka is its most populous city.

Kyushu has always had its own culture and traditions, and has for most of its history been governed largely as a separate entity from the rest of mainland Japan. Even in contemporary times, with modern infrastructure and unity, citizens of Kyushu have maintained a sense of pride in the region’s unique qualities. …[The] museum opened in 2005 to become the fourth national museum in Japan, and the elegant building architecture alone makes it a sight worth seeing. Because Dazaifu was historically a center of international exchange and communication with China, Korea, and other parts of Asia, the museum has made efforts to introduce the history and culture of Kyushu in a wider, Asian context.

The museum had an interactive room, where you could use traditional musical instruments, etc, which the boys enjoyed. Overall the museum is what you would expect from a high quality history museum, and they had audio guides in English, which made it accessible to me and the boys.

We also enjoyed the shopping street that leads up to the shrine and museum. It has a mix of tourist trap shops and some more interesting restaurants and shops that look like they’ve been there forever. It’s also home to the coolest Starbucks I’ve ever seen, which I wrote about earlier. We had a good lunch, and Kai got a cool t-shirt at a samurai shop. They had various shirts featuring the kamon (emblems) of famous historical families. Maria belatedly realized she committed a minor faux pas by asking if they had any for the Minamoto clan, which her family is descended from. They were a northern clan, and the north eventually conquered the south, so it’s sort of like asking for Grant memorabilia in a Civil War shop in South Carolina.

The entrance to the Dazaifu Tenmangu ShrineThe entrance to the Dazaifu Tenmangu Shrine
The entrance to the Dazaifu Tenmangu Shrine20-Jul-2014 13:19, Canon Canon PowerShot ELPH 110 HS, 3.5, 5.958mm, 0.001 sec, ISO 100
 
The Dazaifu Tenmangu ShrineThe Dazaifu Tenmangu Shrine
The Dazaifu Tenmangu Shrine20-Jul-2014 13:37, Canon Canon PowerShot ELPH 110 HS, 3.5, 5.958mm, 0.001 sec, ISO 100
 
On the Dazaifu Tenmangu Shrine groundsOn the Dazaifu Tenmangu Shrine grounds
On the Dazaifu Tenmangu Shrine grounds20-Jul-2014 13:32, Canon Canon PowerShot ELPH 110 HS, 2.7, 4.3mm, 0.002 sec, ISO 100
 
A woman's reaction to her fortune being revealed, by running water over the paperA woman's reaction to her fortune being revealed, by running water over the paper
A woman's reaction to her fortune being revealed, by running water over the paper20-Jul-2014 13:38, Canon Canon PowerShot ELPH 110 HS, 3.5, 5.958mm, 0.001 sec, ISO 100
 
Some of the many prayer boards people have left at the Dazaifu Tenmangu ShrineSome of the many prayer boards people have left at the Dazaifu Tenmangu Shrine
Some of the many prayer boards people have left at the Dazaifu Tenmangu Shrine20-Jul-2014 13:41, Canon Canon PowerShot ELPH 110 HS, 2.7, 4.3mm, 0.002 sec, ISO 100
 
On the Dazaifu Tenmangu Shrine groundsOn the Dazaifu Tenmangu Shrine grounds
On the Dazaifu Tenmangu Shrine grounds20-Jul-2014 13:42, Canon Canon PowerShot ELPH 110 HS, 2.7, 4.3mm, 0.033 sec, ISO 200
 
Inside the Kyushu National MuseumInside the Kyushu National Museum
Inside the Kyushu National Museum20-Jul-2014 14:02, Canon Canon PowerShot ELPH 110 HS, 2.7, 4.3mm, 0.01 sec, ISO 100
 
Eidan in the Kyushu National MuseumEidan in the Kyushu National Museum
Eidan in the Kyushu National Museum20-Jul-2014 14:11, Canon Canon PowerShot ELPH 110 HS, 2.7, 4.3mm, 0.033 sec, ISO 640
 
Eidan in the Kyushu National MuseumEidan in the Kyushu National Museum
Eidan in the Kyushu National Museum20-Jul-2014 14:06, Canon Canon PowerShot ELPH 110 HS, 2.7, 4.3mm, 0.033 sec, ISO 500
 
Older Entries »